Posts Tagged collaboration

Mosaic Release!

balloons

Here it is, guys, in all its glory! I feel as if I’ve talked about it enough. You’ll find the links below to get it FREE. Here’s Christy’s synopsis:

Mosaic is a collection of short stories and poetry ranging from serious to light-hearted. Follow Leonardo as he learns what his inventions have inspired. Wyatt finds hope in a time of darkness. One man learns that even in death his loved ones aren’t really gone. Josephine learns about a mother she hardly knew. Jane attempts to heal from the loss of her father during 9-11. Griffin learns about life on his journey to become a leader. Tracy learns something about the past that leads her to the future. Daniel’s magic pencil makes his drawings come to life. A child is haunted by the thoughts in his head. Zac finds exactly what he needs during an afternoon at a theme park. Sprinkled throughout is a collection of poetry sure to stir up emotions. Inspired by The Story Cartel class, each author brings their own unique style, offering something for everyone.

To find out more about us and the project, go to our WEB site: http://thecartelcollaborative.com

You can get it in just about any electronic format you want – .pdf, kindle, ibook (sorry, I don’t have the ibook link), nook, whatever your heart desires. It should be free on all of these sites (please let me know if it isn’t so I can fix the issue). Click your favorite link below:

To get the .pdf, click the book cover. Otherwise, click on the logo for the site.

 

Mosaic-HR_author_names AmazonSmallSmashwords

 

 

Advertisements

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

And…. it’s coming, folks. Tomorrow!

Mosaic cover sidewaysOne last post on the process of compiling this book and marketing it, not that the last part is finished. I don’t want to bore you, but….

After Margie created the 146 page .pdf, which you can download for free tomorrow here, or from my fellow author’s pages, if you prefer pdfs over kindle, nook, etc. (links will be up here), someone had to transform it into a .doc and get it onto all of those places. I took on this task, following the Smashword style guide to create a .doc file and run it through the lovely program called Meatgrinder (can you think of a worse name?). I tired to make it look as much like Margie’s lovely book as I possibly could (please, please don’t download the .pdf off of Smashwords. It’s not nearly as pretty as Margie’s version, for some reason). Smashwords distributes almost everywhere, except Amazon, so I uploaded it there as well. Christy Zigwied, the last author profiled, below, composed a description.

So the book was ready, but then came marketing. So let me introduce Lee, our main marketing guru (it really does take a village), who has given us all kinds of advice (most of which, we’ve probably ignored, being, you know, introverted writer types who wish the marketing part would magically happen on its own). But a little bit sunk in, I hope. (Sorry, Lee. Maybe as the weeks pass we’ll use more of it. I sure hope so).

Lee J. Tyler

Lee-Jenna-Tyle

Lee apparently loves to surf the WEB for advice about writing and marketing. So, as we went along, she kept putting up helpful links about these topics, and jumping in and suggesting this and that to smooth our way. As I said above, lately she’s been really great, just at the point where most of the rest of us began to freak out (at least, speaking for myself. Maybe everyone else totally has marketing under their belts, but it scares me no end). I’ve been getting about ten emails a day from her.

This brilliant woman contributed a story about a woman who lost her father on 9-11 to Mosaic. She has a novel in progress, as well as a mystery series. You can find her at www.thepointofthequill.com and www.leejtyler.com/about-me/

Christy Zigweid

https://i2.wp.com/thecartelcollaborative.com/home/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Christy-Zigweid-e1421888862699.jpgLast, but not least, we have Christy, who not only contributed a short story to Mosaic, but wrote the book blurb. Christy’s story focuses upon people helping others. There’s of course a dog who brings them together.

Christy was often the first one to jump in with suggestions when anyone raised a question (again that village thingy). She’s working on two novels. You can find her at www.christyzigweid.com.

, , , , ,

2 Comments

Only two more days!

Mosaic-HR_author_namesOver the past three days, I’ve brought you to the point where the stories were finished. Margie Deeb took these and created a beautiful .pdf for us, which you’ll be able to download for free (yes, FREE!) on Wednesday. She chose an elegant style, with black and white graphics for each story, sort of a wood-block look, times new roman font for the text, and a modern font for the story titles. She also set up a table of contents, to ease moving around in the .pdf. We each wrote bios for the end of the book. I can’t even imagine all of the hours which she put into this. She caught typos, and sent our chapters to us for proof-reading, link-checking, etc. This was all volunteer, guys!

James Lee Schmidt, with our input (and a lot of that!) wrote an introduction. He helped Angie with the cover, and Margie put it all together into the document. Finally, we proofed it, and we had a product!!! Yippee! But we weren’t done, yet. I’ll talk about that tomorrow. Right now, though, it’s time for you to meet James.

James Lee Schmidt

https://i2.wp.com/thecartelcollaborative.com/home/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Picture-18-300x225.jpg

He looks awfully serious, doesn’t he? This photo could be a Rembrandt, or some other Dutch Master, like Vermeer, especially with that hat….

Anyway, Mosaic was James’ idea. We were all enrolled in The Story Cartel Course, sending stories back and forth, and chatting, when he asked if anyone wanted to put together a compilation. A few of us signed on, and the book was born. He took the lead in setting up ground rules and making decisions. He was also a great cheerleader and techie support.

James is the author of Strange Tales of the Oskaloosa Oddities Society. He wrote a story for Mosaic about re-finding one’s inner child and understanding that succeeding at work isn’t everything. The story centers around an uncle taking his niece to a theme park, when he doesn’t want to. You can find him at jamesleeschmidt.com

As James says “it takes a village to raise a writer.”

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

A tale of creating a collaborative book

balloons

Almost time to celebrate!

 

Putting together a book like Mosaic: a collection of creative writing (to be released on March 25th!) is a lengthy process. I certainly had no idea how much work would be involved when I raised my virtual hand and said, ‘yes! I’ll do it.’

To start with, we had to do two things: write a draft of our stories, and come up with a plan.

The first part was pure fun for me. I love inventing stories. The second part was a little more tedious, but, between our more experienced writers, and the congeniality of the group, we decided that each story would go through two rounds of critiques, and then everyone would hire their own editors. We also decided not to charge for the book (which means that you’ll be able to get it for free!) Angelique Mroczka offered us a cover design – wait until you see the gorgeous job she did. Oh, and we came up with deadlines and the other details of getting something truly professional into print.

Our first deadline arrived. Ten people submitted works. So far so good. It was time to critique. Critiquing is an art, similar, but different from editing. One of the things which I find difficult is noting what’s good about a piece, especially when they’re a little raw, as some these were. What’s good might be the concept, the plot, the characters, or all of it. Then there’s what’s not working and some suggestions for how to fix it. Some critiques were almost as good as any professional edit, while others were pretty casual. Anyway, we (mostly) all read every piece and posted our critiques.

Then we had to read all of those critiques. Some of mine were pretty tough to take. It was clear that one of my two stories didn’t work at all. What a bummer. I’d written a short short (less than a thousand words), and it had to be completely rethought, re-plotted, etc. I remember tearing my hair out. I wanted to remove it, and I wasn’t the only author who had that reaction.

More about the process tomorrow! But now, I want to introduce two more of our amazing contributors, Stef Gonzaga and S. J. Henderson.

Stef Gonzaga:

Stef GonzagaStef has five poems in Mosaic. Initially, we’d planned on a book of short stories, but she wanted to write poems, and I’m so glad she did. They’re lively short pieces, which completely change the flavor of the book. There’s one about a snake (my personal favorite?), and one about love, and – well you’ll just have to read them, won’t you?

Besides being our only poet, she’s the only contributor who doesn’t live in the United States. Lots of onlies! She’s a writer and editorial manager for DesignGood, and has several books available on her WEB site (another collaborative project, a workbook on creativity, and more). Her techie skills were invaluable in allowing us to finish this project, and she set up our WEB site (yes, we have one!!!). Head over to learn more: stefgonzaga.com

S. J. Henderson:

Sunny Henderson

The most important thing you need to know about S. J. is that she loves to ride horses (can you tell from the photo?). I’m kidding, but they do seem to play a very important role in her life. Actually, the most important thing you should know is that she has published two wonderful, funny, children’s books for the 6-12 age group, Daniel the Draw-er, and Daniel the Camp-er,  and is working on a YA fantasy/horror novel (it’s fantastic, guys, really. I was a beta reader for her. I just wish she had published it already, so I could give you the link and you could buy it). Another important fact is her love of coffee. She has one not-at-all funny piece about autism and one hilarious piece about Daniel in Mosaic.

S. J., as the only one of us who’d self-published novels, provided lots of wisdom and advice as we stumbled along towards publication. She’s been a fount of information, and a steady head throughout, as well as a damn good critique-er who can see plot holes everyone else misses. I deliberately didn’t link to her novels up above, because you simply have to go to her WEB site, where you can get autographed copies. sjhenderson.net

Are you starting to get the idea that collaboration can be amazing?

Thanks to Naurich at freeimages.com for the photo of balloons.

, , , , ,

3 Comments